Medicin

You will attend teaching and gain clinical experience in a variety of clinical environments , including the  University Hospital. This is among Europe’s largest acute hospitals, and includes a purpose-built learning and teaching facility, teaching laboratories and a state-of-the-art clinical skills suite.

Programme structure
Our innovative and forward-thinking curriculum is delivered through a range of teaching styles which include small-group teaching, problem-based learning, lectures, Vocational and Clinical Studies, labs and e-learning. You will gain experience of a clinical environment from year 1. it follows a “spiral curriculum” where subject material is revisited at different stages of the curriculum with increasing depth and clinical focus.

You will undertake two periods of elective study, and can select from over 20 intercalated degree options, allowing flexibility to study areas of personal interest in more depth.

We have strong links with the Postgraduate Deanery, ensuring a smooth transition from undergraduate study to postgraduate training, and produce highly trained, competent graduates who are equipped for the Foundation Training programme, for higher training, and the challenges of medicine in the 21st century.

Phase 1
Phase 1 occupies the first half of year 1. It is an overview of basic biomedical sciences, providing you with the knowledge required to engage in the rest of the undergraduate programme. You will undertake sessions in Vocational and Professional Studies, have your first Clinical Skills sessions and undertake a clinical visit to an A&E ward or General Practice.

Phase 2
Phase 2 occupies the second part of year 1 and the whole of year 2. It is a system-by-system programme that covers the anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, biochemistry (and related biomedical sciences) of the major clinical systems. It also includes sessions of Vocational and Professional Studies, Communication Skills and Clinical Skills.

Phase 3
Phase 3 occupies the first half of year 3 and is a system-by-system cycle through clinical systems with the focus on pathophysiology, building on knowledge acquired in Phases 1 & 2. There are major contributions from pathology, microbiology, haematology, clinical biochemistry and clinical pharmacology, and the small-group teaching is focused on clinical cases, using case-based learning (CBL), with a clinical tutor. You also have one day per week in hospital or general practice. You will also receive clinical procedural skills teaching.

Phase 4
Phase 4 occupies the second half of year 3, all of year 4 and the first half of year 5. It is based in hospitals and in general practice, with dedicated academic days. Teaching is structured around 5-10 week clinical attachments, and you will rotate through general medicine and surgery, obstetrics and gynaecology, child health, general practice, psychiatry, and a variety of hospital sub-specialties.

Preparation for Practice
Preparation for Practice follows the final examinations and involves shadowing foundation-year doctors in hospital, usually attached to the hospital units in which you will work. A lecture programme is also included in this attachment. Successful completion of Preparation for Practice is a prerequisite to graduate.

Vocational & Professional Studies
You will have early contact with patients through hospital visits, clinical training and Communication Skills, starting in year 1.

Clinical Skills
ISRU begins Clinical Skills training in year 1. The early years focus on clinical assessment, including normal clinical history and examination and clinical procedural skills; with the focus in the later years being on pathological findings and diagnosis.